Do I have COVID-19 or a cold?

Do I have COVID-19 or a cold?

If you don't have a fever and your eyes aren't itchy, it's probably the common cold, not COVID-19.

Do I have COVID-19 or allergies?

It's probably allergies -- not COVID-19 -- if you don't have a fever but your eyes are itchy, you're sneezing, and you have a runny nose.

How long will it take to develop a coronavirus vaccine?

Experts say testing of a vaccine for the new coronavirus will be much faster than for a typical vaccine. But it will still last 12 to 18 months, at best.

What is helping efforts to find a coronavirus vaccine?

Scientists studying an experimental vaccine for the new coronavirus have gotten a boost from research on similar coronaviruses that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

How long will it take to make a coronavirus vaccine?

The companies working on vaccines are also looking at ways to ramp up production quickly. One company says that once a vaccine is approved, it could put out 100 million doses a year if it focused all its efforts on that one product.

How might a coronavirus vaccine help down the road, even if it takes years to make?

Experts say the new coronavirus could turn out to be seasonal, like colds and the flu. A vaccine might not be ready until after the current pandemic is over, but it may be vital if the cycle begins again.

Are there medications to treat COVID-19?

Numerous clinical trials are under way to explore treatments used for other conditions that could fight COVID-19 and to develop new ones.

How do you treat COVID-19?

Unless you have serious symptoms or your condition gets worse quickly, you can most likely treat your symptoms at home, like you would for a cold or the flu. Most people can recover from COVID-19 without the need for hospital care. Your doctor can help you decide whether it's best to stay home or go the hospital.

Is there an antiviral drug for COVID-19?

Right now, scientists are trying to develop new medicines and test some existing antiviral drugs to see if they can help in the treatment of COVID-19.

How can you treat COVID-19 symptoms at home?

If your symptoms are mild enough to recover at home, you should:

  • Rest. It can make you feel better and may speed your recovery.
  • Stay home. Don't go to work, school, or public places.
  • Drink fluids. Dehydration can make symptoms worse.
  • Monitor. If your symptoms get worse, call your doctor right away.
  • Ask your doctor about over-the-counter medicines that may help, like acetaminophen to lower your fever.

The most important thing to do is to avoid infecting other people.

When does COVID-19 need hospital care?

If you have serious symptoms, like trouble breathing, or if your symptoms get worse suddenly, you may need to go to the hospital for treatment. If you think you need help right away, call your doctor's office or hospital and tell them you're on the way and that you think you might have COVID-19. That will help them prepare for your arrival.

How do doctors treat COVID-19 in the hospital?

Doctors will check you for more serious problems. They might:

  • Check the levels of oxygen in your blood with a clip-on finger monitor
  • Listen to your lungs
  • Give you a chest X-ray or CT scan

You may get oxygen to breathe through two small tubes that go just inside your nostrils. In very serious cases, doctors will connect you to a machine that can breathe for you, called a ventilator.

You may also get fluids through an IV to keep you from getting dehydrated. Doctors will also closely monitor your breathing.

When does COVID-19 need hospital care?

If you have serious symptoms, like trouble breathing, or if your symptoms get worse suddenly, you may need to go to the hospital for treatment. If you think you need help right away, call your doctor's office or hospital and tell them you're on the way and that you think you might have COVID-19. That will help them prepare for your arrival.

Our Location

1180 Beacon St. Suite 7A Brookline, MA 02446

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Sick visits by on-call physician

Sunday:

Sick visits by on-call physician

Meet Our Staff

  • Meredith Saillant,
    MD
    Pediatrician

    Dr. Saillant completed undergraduate and graduate degrees at Brown University and  The University of Michigan, respectively, before graduating from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 2000.  She completed her pediatric residency in 2003 training at Children's Hospital Boston and Boston Medical Center through the Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics.  She founded the town-wide middle school baseline concussion screening program in conjunction with the Town of Brookline in 2012 and has served as a consultant to the Pediatric Physicians Organization at Children's Hospital on their concussion treatment protocol. She is on the board of the Massachusetts Concussion Management Coalition. She joined the practice in 2003.

  • Rebecca Horne,
    MD
    Pediatrician

    Dr. Horne graduated from Brown University and received her MD from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.  Before going to medical school, she spent a year in Eritrea working in HIV/AIDS awareness and a year working at Planned Parenthood's public outreach department.  Dr. Horne completed her pediatric residency in the Boston Combined Residency Program at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Medical Center.  She spent several years at Boston Children's Hospital providing care for patients in the Young Parents Program.  She joined the practice in 2010.

  • Julie Dollinger, MD
    Pediatrician

    Dr. Dollinger graduated from Princeton University and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and also holds a Master's degree in pharmacology from New York University.  She completed her pediatric training at Boston Children's Hospital, and has practiced general pediatrics in the greater Boston area for over 20 years.  Dr. Dollinger's areas of interests include developmental-behavioral pediatrics, adolescent medicine, natural/holistic medicine, and adoption. Dr. Dollinger has worked in the Indian Health Service in Chinle, AZ and Wolf Point, MT; she has travelled on medical missions to Cuba and Dneprepotrovsk, Ukraine.  Locally, she is a longtime member of the Maimonides Society (the medical philanthropic arm of Boston Combined Jewish Philanthropies) and has been medical consultant to several area preschools and private schools.  She also serves as Director of the Community Pediatrics Program at Boston Childrens Hospital.She joined the practice in 2017

  • Shana Zandman, MD
    Pediatrician

    Dr. Zandman graduated from Cornell University where she studied Human Biology and Development.  She received her MD from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in Manhattan and completed her pediatric residency at the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center.  Dr. Zandman completed one year as Chief Resident at Floating Hospital and then worked for two years in a busy pediatric private practice in Barrington, Rhode Island prior to joining the practice in 2014.  She enjoys spending time with her husband and two young girls, cooking and international travel.